Friday, May 22, 2015

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
Romans 12:2 “And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.”  Since God has an acceptable, good, and perfect will, it is not unreasonable to believe that he has a will concerning how a Christian musics unto Him.

              

Is Adiaphorous Religious Musicing Possible?

Is Adiaphorous Religious Musicing Possible?    
                Christian musicians who are trying to develop a congruent Christian music philosophy should understand that many Christians, who are conservative in many areas of their lives, consider the way that contemporary Churches music to be an adiaphorous form of worship.  They really believe that the conflict over contemporary Christian music to be “much ado about nothing”. 
             When I was mentioning some performance styles and practices that I considered being offensive, one of my colleagues recently said to me, “I believe we’ve already lost that battle”.  Just because the postmodern church musics a certain way and furthermore, just because many conservatives have been so conditioned by repeatedly hearing a style of religious music that they no longer oppose it, does not make it a good choice.
            The “neither good nor bad” notion about religious music has become the slippery slope that has finally led to style and performance practice capitulation. Although his book was on a completely different topic, the title of Thomas Anthony Harris’s I'm OK, You're OK New York Times best seller has been taken out of context in the development of a false notion by the postmodern church. This philosophical fallacy has allowed these musicians to believe a convenient falsehood rather than deal with an obvious truth. This everything goes philosophy fits well with the adiaphorous philosophy of contemporary Christian musicians.  Many Christians, including a host of Christians who are conservative in many of their beliefs, seem to believe that all the possible ways that religious musicers can possibly music are OK. Simply put, although there are wonderful things happening in sacred music in this century, everything that is happening in church music is not OK!

 

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Thought, Song, and Prayer for the Day

Thought for the Day
No Christian musician wishes to be misunderstood when it comes to his or her musicing.  Never-the-less it is most likely going to happen sooner or later.  When misunderstanding comes the Christian musician must be sure that his or her music philosophy is congruent with good common sense and what the bible teaches about music and musicing.
Song for the Day I gave My Life for Thee by Frances Havergal
Prayer for the Day
My precious Lord and Savior I want You to know that I trust You to guide me through the struggles of this life.  Even though I trust you, I need Your help to remain calm when I am misunderstood by others.  The three Hebrew Children are remembered because they remained calm in the fiery furnace.  Lord, I must confess to You that I probably would not have remained calm in that situation.  I need you every hour of every day because although I trust that You are able to protect me, sometimes I’m not sure that you will.  Lord, I love You and want to show your love You by living out my trust for You.  Lord I am asking You to help me not to fall down and capitulate in the time of trouble. This honest prayer I am praying this dy.  Amen.

 

 

 

Be Ready to Fall Down

Be Ready to Fall Down
        Daniel 3:5 states “That at the time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, and dulcimer, and all kinds of music, ye fall down and worship the golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king hath set up.” This ancient admonition sounds like a twenty-first century admonition to worship whenever and whatever is going down musically at a particular time.  These three Hebrew men refused to violate their conscience musically or spiritually.  Twenty-first century musicians are at times put in a place where they will have to take a stand.  The Bible lesson in this Scripture is very clear.  These three men would not worship the Chaldean image and they would not worship with “all kinds of music” merely because they were pressured to conform.  
       The result was that they got themselves thrown into a fiery furnace.  Sorry!  These men took a stand about worship style and idol worship which incurred the wrath of those who were in charge.  Those in authority were so mad that they heated the furnace seven times hotter than normal.  So, if you take a stand musically and spiritually, get ready to enter the fiery furnace.
       These three Hebrew men maintained a meek and quiet spirit, which included a good attitude, and God honored them and took care of them.  You may feel that you are in the fiery furnace because you refuse to go along with worship that that does not follow Bible principles of musicing unto God.  However you must stay “cool” in the midst of the hot furnace.  If you do, God will take care of you.  God cared so much for Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego that He got into the furnace with them.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Thought for the Day


Thought for the Day
Colossians 1:16, “For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him.”  God not only created the visible part of music, He also created the invisible part  i.e. sound.
 

How Did Music Begin?-part 2


How Did Music Begin?-part 2 
               God truly created music. Although the word created is used loosely by many musicians, man never actually creates music or anything for that matter.  God took nothing and made something--that something was music.  Music composers and arrangers only "construct"--they only are capable of "arranging"  or moving God's created musical building blocks into new artistic patterns.  A contractor who builds a building takes created materials and uses them to construct something.  He always takes "something" and constructs with these materials.  No matter how great a building a contractor constructs or how much *creative effort he exerts, what he puts together is not truly a creation.  We will discuss “creativeness further in chapter eleven under the topic Creativity and the Christian Musician.

             I  have often said that God did not create music because He was destined to do so.  God did not create music because it was in His destiny or future.  God very clearly explained this to Moses when He declared in Exodus 3:14, “And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.”  God did not say I will be God in the future but rather hayah asher hayah(1961,834,1961) which means according to Dr. Clarke’s research, “The Vulgate translates I am who am.  The Septuagint, I am he who exists.  The Syriac, the Persic, and the Chaldee preserve the original words without any gloss.”  Clarke’s commentary, Vol. 1, p. by Adam Clarke, 306  So, I gave all the previous explanation to try to explain that God does not have a beginning or end, but rather in His own words He simply explains I AM. 

 

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Thought for the Day


Thought for the Day

John 1:3, “All things were made by him; and without him was not anything made that was made.”  It stands to reason that “all things” includes music.

 

How Did Music Begin?-part 1


How Did Music Begin?-part 1  

                We know from Genesis 1:1 that,” In the beginning God  created”.  From this *truism let us explore the philosophical presupposition that in the beginning God created music.  Many church musicians do not start with this necessary philosophical basis.  On the contrary, many Christian musicians believe that there is no answer to the question, “How did music begin?”  They fail to recognize the evident answer found in Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning God created...”  

            God did not need to create music because He is and always has been without need.  In His divine wisdom and sovereignty He chose to create music and that was not because He had too, but rather because He desired to create it.  So He thought it into existence—that is creation.  God did not create music to fulfill his destiny, because He has no destiny.  He was not “I will be” or if I create music my creation will be more perfect because everything that He created before and after He created music was perfect.  Although this is difficult for a musician to conceptualize, God’s creation was completely perfect with and/or without music.  Think about it, God’s creation did not get better or more complete or more perfect when He created music because God never gets better. We as Christian musicians do things to perfect our musical skills in our long journey toward the development of our God given musical gifts. God did not take a long or short musical journey.  He simply thought and absolutely nothing became something—music.  That is creation.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Song, Thought, and Prayer for the Day

Song for the Day Wonderful Grace of Jesus by Haldor Lillenas
Thought for the day
Ephesians 5:20-21 “Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ; Submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God.” 
Prayer for the Day
Lord, I am asking You to help me to always music for Your glory and Honor.  Please cover me with your grace and purify my motives for being a minister of music.  Please help me to lift up your name instead of my own name and self.  Help me to be Your humble musical servant.  Help me to submit all my musicing to You. This I am asking in your Name.  Amen.

Musicing about God, for God with God’s Grace

Musicing about God, for God with God’s Grace
            Colossians 3:16-17 teaches, “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.  And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him.”  Many speakers and writers miss the lessons taught in these two verses.  Also many Bible expositors skip these verses in their comments or at least they make little or no mention of the music lesson taught here.  I suspect they were so intent on getting to the eighteenth verse so that they could once again tell women to submit!
            I would like to take a brief moment to remind Christian musicians of the main reasons that we music.  First, we must always music “in the name of the Lord Jesus”.  The Greek word used her is kurios (2962) which connotes supreme authority, or one who is the Christian’s Lord and master.  Christian musicians often tend to get lost in the fact that they are giving a music performance or that they work for and represent a particular   church. Although all of the above may be true, a Christian musician’s boss so to speak, is God.  Second, the Christian musician who is performing the psalms, hymn, and spiritual songs does so as a vehicle for giving thanks to God the Father by the mediatorial agency of God the Son.  Third, a musician who performs or leads others in sacred music must have the grace (charis 5485) God in his or her heart.  This Scripture is not referring to man’s charisma but rather God’s grace.