Saturday, November 1, 2014

Prayer for this Blog in November

Prayer for this Blog in November
Lord, as I have asked you so many times, please allow this Music philosophy blog to be a blessing during the month of October 2014. It is also my sincere and earnest prayer let this blog go around the world to places where I cannot go.  Lord, thank you that you are answering my prayer by guiding people from ninety seven countries find and read my blog posts. Help me as I prepare a post for each day to be sensitive to the Holy Spirit.  Only you know Lord who is out there ministering musically that needs a fresh anointing for musical ministry.  Help me to know which philosophical and devotional topics are important and will be a blessing.  I am asking You Lord to give special help as we include posts on Christian music education, music philosophy, church music, and music of the Bible. Lord, you know that at times I am not sure which topics to write about concerning music. Please anoint the blog and the blogger.  Please give special help to our new blog family members from the Countries of Tanzania and Armenia which were added to our blog family during September.  These things I ask in your great and wise and wonderful name.  Amen.

 

Thank you for a Great Month of October

Thank you for a Great Month of October
            Last month was the 22nd month of my blog which contains devotional and philosophical thoughts for Christian musicians.  I am praising God for the country listed below which was added to the blog family during the month of October.  I have been praying that my posts in 2014 would stimulate new blog members and that the regular viewers would also be blessed by their content. It is my continued prayer that each new post will bring honor to our heavenly Father.  My posts in the month of October were devotional and philosophical in nature.  A few of them discussed music education. 
       Since we began on January 2 of 2013 we have received a total of over 40,900 page views with about 3,550 views in October of 2014 which is nearly three times the normal amount of 1,200.  Praise God! Since I started this blog the page views have come from 97 different countries. 
            These views have come from Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Australia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo [DRC], Costa Rica, Croatia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hong Kong,  Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland (Republic of),  Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,  Morocco, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Porto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, Turks & Caicos Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, and the USA.
 I would like to welcome the Countries of Tanzania and Armenia which were added to our blog family during October.   The ten countries with the most page views in October were: USA, France, Germany, Canada, Ukraine, Japan, Singapore, United Kingdom, and China.   If you are from a country that has had page views in the past 22 months and has been omitted from the 97 countries listed above, please email me your country’s name.  Please continue to pray with me that God will allow this Music Philosophy Blog to continue to go places where I will never have the opportunity to minister musically in person. Please pray for me, as I have mentioned before, I am in the process of writing a general music philosophy book and a devotional book for musicians.  The summer months have been very busy and it has been difficult to make progress on either project.
        I want to thank all of you who have taken the time to view my music philosophy blog during the month of October.  Please continue to pray that God will guide each post and allow it to reach those who need encouragement to keep ministering for our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.
       The main reason that I started this Music Philosophy blog is that although there is much music philosophy information on the net, not very much of it is from a biblical perspective.  Please share the blog address with your friends.   If you have an area of music or fine arts philosophy that troubles you, please feel free to let me know and I will include it in our discussions.  My email address is Garenlwolf@gmail.com.
 

Friday, October 31, 2014

Though for the Day

Though for the Day
It is surprising that for centuries so many scholars of ancient music stubbornly resisted the thought that ancient music utilized octaves.

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 4

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 4
            At this point in our discussion it would be helpful to clear up some misconceptions concerning the use of women in the Temple.  They are never mentioned as part of the professional Levite musicians.  I Chronicles 25:5b states, "And God gave to Heman fourteen sons and three daughters."  Many Bible commentators and writers on church music have taken this as evidence that Heman's three daughters were Levite musicians.  They were, of course, Levites, but they were not used in the Temple as musicians.  Verse 7 gives the total number of Levite musicians as 288 and verses 8-31 give the twenty-four divisions of musicians, each under the direction of a man, his sons, and his brethren.  None of the three daughters of Heman are mentioned.
            Statements in Ezra 2:64-65 and Nehemiah 7:66-67 refer to the number of those who returned from Babylon - 42,360 of the congrega­tion and an additional 7,337 servants.  Out of this group of servants there were from 200 to 245 singing men and singing women.  They were all servants, not Levites.  Likewise, the musicians mentioned in II Samuel 19:35 and II Chronicles 35:25 were public professional singers and mourners, not Levite musicians who performed a part of Temple worship.
            The use of the Hebrew word alamoth (5961) in I Chronicles 15:20 and in the title of Psalm 46 is often mistaken for the use of women in Temple music.  The word alamoth (5961) is the plural form of almah (5959), which is always, translated virgin, maid, damsels, and virgins.  A correct rendering of 5961 is probably soprano-like, in the range of maidens, soprano, or falsetto like.  The word probably should be rendered an octave higher that the voice of a man.  The subject of the use of a seven or eight note scale has been discussed more thoroughly in Chapter VIII of my book Music of the Bible in Christian Perspective.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day 

It amazes me to read the works of authors who respect the Biblical Record but entertain the notion that the authors of Scripture would alter the Record because of personal prejudice.

 

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 3

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 3

            So the question is not whether women were involved in religious and secular music in the Bible, but whether or not they were used as practicing Temple musicians.  Rothmuller quoted Ambros as saying that "This temple music differs from its contempo­rary Egyptian counterpart by the essential circumstance that Egypt music was already entirely the women's function, whereas in Jerusalem only men were appointed to its performance."    Aaron Rothmuller, The Music of the Jews p.44, (quoting August Wilhelm Ambrose)  Idelsohn agreed with Rothmuller when he stated that "Participation of women in the temple choir is nowhere traceable."  A. Z.  Idelsohn, Jewish Music in Its Historical Development, p. 16. 
                Sendrey, who did not have a high regard for the authenticity of the Biblical Record, believed that "In their purificatory zeal, the priestly chroniclers tried particularly to eliminate anything that might have alluded to, or recalled, the primitive pagan, pre-Yahvistic rites of the Hebrews, when women participated regularly in them."  Alfred Sendrey, Music in the Social and Religious Life of Antiquity, p. 251. However, Sendrey did not attempt to document his notion of women participating in pagan pre-Yahvistic religious music in ancient Israel.  Sendrey does concede that, "The Biblical account contains no direct references to the participation of female singers in the Temple choir."  Ibid, p. 251.

 

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day 

It is a common misconception that the Old Testament mention of women’s involvement as musicians should be considered as Bible principles of musicing in public worship.

 

 

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 2

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 2
            As we mentioned in yesterday’s post, the examples of women's involvement in music mentioned in the Old Testament were not a part of Temple worship.  Yesterday we quoted Exodus 15:20-21 which mentioned women’s involvement in music. I Samuel 18:6-7 also considers women being involved as musicians when it states,
            And it came to pass as they came, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Philis­tine, that the women came out of all cities of Israel, singing (7891) and dancing, to meet king Saul, with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music.
            And the women answered (6030) one (NIO) another (NIO) as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.
On this secular occasion the women (no men involved) played, sang, danced, and anah (6030) sang together by course.
            It is commonly believed that music and especially singing was universal in the ancient Hebrew culture.  "Everyone in Israel sang, and playing the lyre and the timbrel was a common achievement, at least among women."  Curt Sachs, The Rise of Music in the Ancient World p. 90.    Also, "Written records as well as pictorial displays testify to the various activities of women as dancers, singers, and instrumentalists."  Alfred Sendrey, Music in the Social and Religious Life of Antiquity, p. 2.

 

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Thought for the day

Thought for the Day
The reason scholars are so interested in worship in the first and second Temples is that they show us the Old Testament pattern for public worship.

 

 

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 1

ARE WOMEN MUSICIANS MENTIONED IN THE BIBLE? Part 1
            Along with the age old argument as to whether instruments should be used in the church, is the argument of the use or disuse of women in the music of the ancient Jewish Temple and its relationship to the use of women in church music today.  A review of Scripture does not reveal that women were used as musicians in either the first or the second Temple.  Also, Jewish history or rabbinical literature does not clearly substantiate their involve­ment as professional musicians in the Temple.  Research of other ancient cultures such as that of Egypt has shown that women were used extensively in public worship.  However, the culture and circumstances of ancient Israel precluded the use of women in Temple music.
            We know that it was common practice for women to sing and play instruments in ancient Israel since there are numerous Biblical references to their involvement in music.  Exodus 15:20-21 states,
            And Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand; and all the women went out after he with timbrels and with dances.
            And Miriam answered them, Sing (7891) ye to the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea. 
Here we see a public rendering of praise to God in the performance of the "song of Moses."  Moses, the children of Israel (vs. 1) and Miriam and the women (vs. 20) sang the song.  Notice the separation of "Moses and the children of Israel" from the singing, playing and dancing of the women (vs. 20-21).  This example of women's involvement in music was not, of course, a part of Temple worship.