Saturday, August 1, 2015

Prayer for this Blog in August


Prayer for this Blog in August
            I want to thank You Lord and Father for the 106 countries that are a part of our blog family.  I also want to thank you heavenly Father for helping me to write each daily post during the month of June.  It is my sincere and earnest prayer let this blog will go around the world to places where I cannot go.  Lord, thank You that You are answering my prayer by guiding people from one hundred and one countries to find and read my blog posts. Help me as I prepare a post for each day to be sensitive to the Holy Spirit.  Only you know Lord who is out there ministering musically that needs a fresh anointing for musical ministry.  Help me to know which philosophical and devotional thoughts will help these busy pastors and musicians.  Lord, you know that I am not sure which aspects of music education and music ministry to write about that will stimulate and encourage the blog family.  Please anoint the blog, the blogger, and the bog readers. If it is your will I am asking that the number of page views will increase during this month. These things I ask in your great and wise and wonderful name.  Amen.

 

Thank you for a Great Month of July

Thank you for a Great Month of July
            Last month was the 31th month of my blog which contained devotional and philosophical thoughts for Christian musicians.  I have been praying that my posts in 2015 would stimulate new blog members and that the regular viewers would also be blessed by their content. It is my continued prayer that each new post will bring honor to our heavenly Father.  My posts in the month of June were a mixture of philosophical and devotional topics. Some of them were expanded discussions of previously discussed material.
       Since we began on January 2 of 2013 we have received a total of over 55,000 page views with over 1,800 views in July which is about the amount of views in June of 2015.  Since I started this blog the page views have come from 106 different countries. 
            These views have come from Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Argentina, Armenia,  Aruba, Austria, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Colombia, Congo [DRC], Costa Rica, Croatia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, Finland, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hong Kong,  Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland (Republic of),  Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia,  Morocco, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands (Antilles) New Zealand, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru. Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Porto Rico, Qatar, RĂ©union, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, Turks & Caicos Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, and the USA.  We would like to welcome Azerbaijan, who had its first page views this month, to our blog family. The ten countries with the most page views in June were: USA, Germany, Russia, Portugal, France, Philippines, China, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and India.
          If you are from a country that has had page views in the past 31 months and has been omitted from the 106 countries listed above, please email me your country’s name.  Please continue to pray with me that God will allow this Music Philosophy Blog to continue to go places where I will never have the opportunity to minister musically in person. Please pray for me, as I have mentioned before, I am in the process of writing a general music philosophy book and a devotional book for musicians. My philosophy book is now in the hands of the content editor.  So, please pray for her as she works on it. Please pray that the proof reader and organizer of the devotional book will have time to also work on this project.
        I want to thank all of you who have taken the time to view my music philosophy blog during the month of June and a special thanks is in order to those countries that faithfully view this blog month after month.  Please continue to pray that God will guide each post and allow it to reach those who need encouragement to keep ministering for our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.
       The main reason that I started this Music Philosophy blog is that, although there is much music philosophy information on the net, not very much of it is from a biblical perspective.  Please share the blog address with your friends.   If you have an area of music or fine arts philosophy that troubles you, please feel free to let me know and I will include it in our discussions.  My email address is Garenlwolf@gmail.com.
 

Friday, July 31, 2015

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
It is amazing to me that so few music ministers consider themselves to be teachers as well as being performers, directors, and worship leaders.   Remember that Chenaniah was a teacher of the message of song that YHVH had borne in upon him.

 

 

Burden for Song

Burden for Song
            Probably the most important thought in I Chronicles 15:22, and another concept that has not fared well in most translations, is the importance of the words "was for song" (massa 4853) The Hebrew word massa is often misunderstood here as meaning "carriage."  Therefore, some translators and commentators have believed that this verse is explaining that he was an expert in handling the Ark of the Covenant, since the fifteenth chapter gives a detailed account of bringing the ark up to Jerusalem.
             However, it is important to note that the portion of that chapter, including verses sixteen through twenty-four, is a musical discourse concerning the Levites that King David placed in charge of pre-Temple music at the time of the moving of the ark and placing it in the tent.  We know from verse fifteen that Levites did in fact carry the ark after the due order of Moses, but if Chenaniah was a teacher of ark carriage then why was he mentioned in the middle of the list of Levite musicians in verses 19-21 and why was the so-called teacher of "handling the ark" walking with the singers?  Why was he not walking as verse twenty-seven states, with ". . . the Levites that bare the ark?"  We will discuss these questions in tomorrow’s post.

 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
It is my desire that it will be said of me when I depart this life that I was a musician that God planted strategically in His harvest field for a particular purpose.  Are you willing to not only let God plant you but also allow Him to keep you planted where He placed you?

 

 

A Skillful Singing Instructor

A Skillful Singing Instructor
            It seems that a much more tenable hypothesis would be that Chenaniah was a skillful singing instructor who had a great burden for song borne in upon him of God.  The word massa used here is found many times in the Old Testament. This word used of Chenaniah is the same word which is burden in Isaiah 13:1 which states, "The burden massa (4853) of Babylon, which Isaiah the son of Amos did see."  The Book of Nahum also uses the word massa (Nahum 1:1) when it mentions, "The burden (massa 4853) of Nineveh.  The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite."  Also, Habakkuk 1:1 states, "The burden (4853) which Habakkuk the prophet did see."  So we can see that the word massa used of Chenaniah the chief singer was also used of the prophets Isaiah, Nahum and Habakkuk.
            What does the word massa mean?  W.E. Vine has stated that, "The word 'burden' (Hebrew massa, a thing lifted up) is used, for example, in Nahum 1:1, signifying the burden of prophesy which was borne in upon the prophet when he received it from the Lord." Vine's Old Testament Words, p. 105. In other words Chenaniah's message for song was borne in upon him from the Lord just like the message of God was given to the prophets.  It wasn't perfect pitch, a beautiful sounding voice or his knowledge of vocal pedagogy that made Chenaniah great, but instead, it was his spiritual communication with Jehovah that brought him to prominence.  From the Biblical record it seems that the outstanding factor of this chief musician's life was his serious and powerful music ministry in Israel.

 

 

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
It is amazing to me that so few music ministers consider themselves to be teachers as well as being performers, directors, and worship leaders.   Remember that Chenaniah was a teacher of the message of song that YHVH had borne in upon him.

Burden for Song


Burden for Song
            Probably the most important thought in I Chronicles 15:22, and another concept that has not fared well in most translations, is the importance of the words "was for song" (massa 4853) The Hebrew word massa is often misunderstood here as meaning "carriage."  Therefore, some translators and commentators have believed that this verse is explaining that he was an expert in handling the Ark of the Covenant, since the fifteenth chapter gives a detailed account of bringing the ark up to Jerusalem.
             However, it is important to note that the portion of that chapter, including verses sixteen through twenty-four, is a musical discourse concerning the Levites that King David placed in charge of pre-Temple music at the time of the moving of the ark and placing it in the tent.  We know from verse fifteen that Levites did in fact carry the ark after the due order of Moses, but if Chenaniah was a teacher of ark carriage then why was he mentioned in the middle of the list of Levite musicians in verses 19-21 and why was the so-called teacher of "handling the ark" walking with the singers?  Why was he not walking as verse twenty-seven states, with ". . . the Levites that bare the ark?"  We will discuss these questions in tomorrow’s post.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
When it comes to the arguments for or against the use of musical instruments with church music based on the imperfect Old Testament covenant and the perfect covenant of the New Testament, there is no foundation for such arguments either inside or the Bible.

INSTRUMENTS USED IN NEW TESTAMENT SINGING-part 3

INSTRUMENTS USED IN NEW TESTAMENT SINGING-part 3
            If the words psallo and psalmos had changed meaning in the New Testament dispensation, and if they clearly represented only singing without any use of instrumental accompaniment whatsoever, why then did St. Paul mention psalms, making melody, and singing in the same passage of Scripture?  To make the meaning of the words clear, let's review their standard meanings.  Psalms (psalmos 5568) meant a Hebrew cantillation for voice and instruments.  Singing (aido 103) was a verb meaning to sing.  Making melody (psallo 5567) meant to twitch or twang or touch (play) the strings of a musical instrument.  With these standard definitions of psalms, singing, and making melody, these words make logical sense in Ephesians 5:19.  If aido and psallo would have had the same meaning St. Paul, the great master of languages, would not have used both words in the same verse. If these words represent the same action (singing) then the verse should be rendered singing and singing in your heart.  Such a thesis does not seem to be tenable.
            There is also the argument that instrumental music was for the old covenant and that it was not religiously "proper" under the new covenant since the sacrificial system was not continued after the death and resurrection of Christ.  It is true that the highly developed system of instrumental music of the Jews was silenced at the time of the destruction of the Second Temple in A.D. 70.  Although this was a dark time for the Jewish music, it does not indicate a New Testament prohibition of the use of instruments in Christian worship.  The persecuted New Testament church was scattered and worshipped sometimes in "secret" which possibly accounts for some of the lack of instrumental music by the New Testament church.  Three things are apparent concerning instrumental music in the New Testament:  (1) it is not mentioned as much in the New Testament as in the Old Testament; (2) many groups of believers worshiped without the aid of instrumental music, and (3) the highly developed music system of the Temple did not continue in the early church.  However, instrumental music is mentioned in the New Testament and is never forbidden in the New Testament writings.